SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL RESOURCES

IN PAKISTAN AND ADJOINING COUNTRIES

 895

The environment throughout Pakistan is being increasingly degraded and supplies of natural resources are increasingly falling short of demands. The primary causes of this situation —growing population, a developing economy and changing patterns of resource use — are not physical, but social. Accordingly, attempts to understand the state of natural resources in Pakistan must begin with its society.

Herein lies the value of this collection of readings. It consists of eighteen studies of different aspects of natural resource use in Pakistan (and surrounding countries). Each study presents data on a particular system of resource use and bases its conclusions and recommendations on these data. Instead of merely saying what should be — as is too often the case with development-related literature, these readings first say what is, and then argue from there.

This collection will be of value to government officials, scientists, professors, and students working in forestry, agriculture, soil conservation, irrigation, watershed management, energy, and environmental protection and conservation.
ISBN: 9694020549
Publisher: VANGUARD BOOKS
Subtitle: IN PAKISTAN AND ADJOINING COUNTRIES
Author: MICHAEL R. DOVE & CAROL CARPENTER

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SKU: 9694020549
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Weight 0.6 kg
ISBN

9694020549

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Publication Date

1992

Pages

458

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Dr. Michael R. Dove, Ph.D., has spent the last eighteen years studying society and natural resources in Asia, in association with Stanford University, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the East-West Center, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Winrock International Institute for Agriculture and Development. From late 1985 to mid-1989, Dr. Dove was Project Anthropologist on the "Forestry Planning and Development Project" in Pakistan. He is currently a Research Associate in the East-West Center's Environment and Policy Institute.Dr. Carol Carpenter, Ph.D., has spent the last ten years conducting research and working in Indonesia and Pakistan, in association with the Fulbright-Hays program and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Dr. Carpenter is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Syracuse University.

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